Monthly Archives: November 2008

CFP: Spring 2009 Political Philosophy Podcast Symposium

Spring 2009 PPPS CFP: 19 December 2009 I’m extending the deadline for submissions for the Spring 2009 podcast symposium until Friday 19 December — SCM. Continuing with the format that we have experimented with this semester, I’d like to invite … Continue reading

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How can I teach Kant–without too much Kant?

Hi all, I just joined Public Reason (having met Simon at a conference) and am looking forward to participating.  I’ve already seen lots of terrific material, and realize that I should have joined long ago. I have what may seem … Continue reading

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PPPS: “Making Space for Rosa Parks: Democratic Authorship as Political Autonomy”

Hi.  I’m Paul Gowder, a Ph.D. candidate in Stanford’s Political Science department.  This paper arose out of another paper that I have in progress.  The other paper, a critique of Rawls’s idea of public reason and an attempt to develop … Continue reading

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Judicial Review and the Value Theory of Democracy: A Response to Corey Brettschneider chapter 7

CB argues for a value theory of democracy as an alternative to procedural and epistemic theories. The three core values which underlie democracy are: equality of interests, political autonomy and reciprocity. These values are implicit in the practices and institutions … Continue reading

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PPPS: “Unhappy Families: Three Ways of Thinking About Imperfect Political Regimes”

I got the idea for this paper while teaching a course on dictatorships and revolutions. The course had little political philosophy content (by design), but we did talk about whether democratic regimes are always to be preferred to non-democratic regimes, … Continue reading

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Brettschneider Reading Group, Chapter 6

In Chapter Six, Corey Brettschneider sets out to argue that citizens of ideal democracies are entitled to basic “welfare guarantees.”  In the two previous chapters, he has argued that democratic citizens are owed certain “negative rights” against state interference; here, … Continue reading

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