Author Archives: Simon Cabulea May

About Simon Cabulea May

Simon Cabulea May is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Florida State University. He received his PhD from Stanford University. His present research project generally concerns conflicts of moral convictions in public deliberation.

Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy #4

Via David Sobel at PEA Soup:

This is the final reminder about the December 1 submission deadline.

We are pleased to announce that the Fourth Annual Workshop for Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy will take place on June 1-3, 2016 at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.

There will be nine papers at this year’s conference, including four invited papers by the following people:

  • Alex Voorhoeve (London School of Economics),
  • Ralf Bader (Oxford),
  • Adam Swift (Warwick) and Zofia Stemplowska (Oxford),
  • Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (Aarhus University)

We are issuing a call for papers to fill the remaining five conference slots. Submitted papers should be between 7,500 and 12,000 words including footnotes, should be totally anonymized, and are due by December 1. (The workshop is being held three months earlier than usual, and hence the deadline is three months earlier.) Accepted papers for the conference will receive serious consideration for inclusion in the resulting Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy volume.

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Stanford Center for Ethics Postdocs

For 2016-2017, the McCoy Family Center for Ethics at Stanford University seeks up to three new postdoctoral fellows:

We welcome candidates with substantial normative research interests from philosophy or political science. We are especially interested in candidates with research interests in inequality, global justice, environmental ethics, biomedical ethics, and ethics and technology, but we welcome all applicants with strong normative interests. Applicants must have a PhD in philosophy or political science; scholars with a JD or JSD are also eligible so long as their research interests focus on ethical issues with an applied dimension. Postdoctoral fellows teach one class per year, mentor undergraduates in the Ethics in Society Honors Program, and contribute to an interdisciplinary ethics community across the campus.

The appointment term is September 1, 2016 – August 31, 2017. The initial term may be renewed for an additional year. Applicants must have completed all requirements for their PhD by June 30, 2016. Candidates must also be no more than 3 years from the awarding of their degree (i.e., September 2013). The application deadline is December 7, 2015 (5:00 pm Pacific Standard Time).

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Michigan: Fellowship in Classical Liberalism

Department of Philosophy, University of Michigan
Postdoc/Research Fellow
Commences September 1, 2015; one-year term, renewable for second year.
Apply by April 24, 2015 for guaranteed consideration.
$55,000/12 months (plus research stipend)

The holder of this postdoc is expected to participate in the Freedom and Flourishing Project (Prof. Daniel Jacobson, PI) by contributing to its research project on the foundations and central tenets of classical liberalism, and their empirical support; organizing its lecture and roundtable series, which has two events per year; and teaching one course each term of the academic year.

The primary responsibility of the holder of this fellowship is to conduct original research in some area of classical liberal thought, whether historical, empirical, or theoretical. The approach can take any central theme of this intellectual movement, and it can but need not focus on interdisciplinary issues of political economy. The holder is expected to produce and publish a significant body of original work. In addition, we expect the fellowship holder will be appointed at 33.33% effort each fall and winter semester as a Lecturer, delivering one (1) course per term (see below). The postdoc effort would be coordinated so the total effort will be 100% over the 12 months. The fellowship holder will also be responsible for organizing a two-event lecture or roundtable series on a relevant and topical issue, with one event to be scheduled per semester.

Teaching up to one course per term as a Lecturer is the expectation. Courses will be assigned at the discretion of the Chair, in consultation with the postdoc, depending upon the needs the department, qualifications of the post-doc, etc. Teaching duties may include either of the 2 core PPE courses: the gateway to the concentration (PPE 300) or the capstone seminar for seniors (PPE 400), as well as courses at any level of the undergraduate Philosophy program, including introductions. The 33.33% effort Lecturer positions would be covered by the collective bargaining agreement between the U-M and the Lecturers’ Employee Organization. Offers for the Lecturer appointments will be made separately from the Research Fellow offer.

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Religion in Liberal Political Philosophy

UCL, 10-12 June, 2015

The Religion and Political Theory Centre (RAPT) at UCL will host a major conference on Religion and Liberal Political Philosophy on 10-12 June this year:

Liberal political philosophers have recently received criticism for their inadequate grasp or unreflective use of the category of religion. Liberal philosophers, it is said, have not sufficiently reflected on the specific trajectory of western secularism. As a result, liberal theories of freedom of religion, of state neutrality, of non-establishment and of the rights of conscience are conceptually, as well as normatively, problematic. This conference will present cutting-edge work in political philosophy that takes these criticisms seriously and offers new perspectives on the normative place of religion in liberal political philosophy.

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CFP: Illiberal Views in Liberal States

Philosophy and Public Issues
Call for papers

Symposium: Illiberal Views in Liberal States
With a discussion of Corey Brettschneider ’s When the State Speaks, What Should It Say? (Princeton University Press, 2012)

Submission Deadline
Long Abstract (1,000 words max): 15 March, 2015
Full paper (10,000 words max, upon acceptance): 15 June, 2015

Invited Contributors
Annabelle Lever (University of Geneva), Jennifer Rubinstein (University of Virginia), Sarah Conly (Bowdoin College), Kevin Vallier (Bowling Green State University) and Corey Brettschneider (Brown University)

Aims and Background
Moral, political or religious pluralism is a permanent feature of many contemporary societies. All moral philosophers and political theorists within the liberal tradition seem to agree on this. However, they profoundly disagree about how to deal with moral, political or religious views that do not accept or even explicitly deny some of liberalism’s tenets, like the idea that all citizens must equally enjoy certain freedoms—such as freedom of expression or of conscience. Here the stakes are high for liberal theorists: if they accept that some citizens live according to, and expressed, some illiberal views, then the liberal State might need to accept conducts and ideas that would otherwise be forbidden; on the other end, if the liberal State reject certain illiberal views, this might contradict or violate liberalism’s foundations—like the idea that a view cannot be legitimately imposed. How should liberals address this point?

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(Britain & Ireland) Association for Political Thought 2015 Conference

The Britain and Ireland Association for Political Thought is pleased to announce pre-registration for its 2015 Conference, to be held at St. Catherine’s College, Oxford (January 8th-10th):

The conference schedule is as follows:

Thursday: 8th January
2.30-4.00. Leigh Jenco (LSE): “What is the Revival of Confucianism Really Reviving? Towards a “creative engagement” with traditions in the Global Age”
4.30-6.00. Benjamin Holland (Nottingham): “On the Threshold of Modern Liberty: reconstructing the early Jesuit free-will defence”
6.30. Reception: sponsored by Contemporary Political Theory
8.30-10.00. APT Lecture sponsored by CRISPP: Joseph Carens (Toronto): “Some Questions about How to Do Political Theory”

Friday: 9th January
9.15-10.45 Cecile Laborde (UCL): “Who Needs Freedom of Religion?”
11.15-12.45  Winner of the Cambridge University Press Graduate Essay Prize:  Signy Gutnick Allen (QMUL): “‘Away then with all your niceties in law’: English Debates on the Nature of Treason, 1641-1651?
2.00. Session for graduate students with Susan Hanshaw (Arts and Humanities Research Council): funding for political theory research
3.00.  APT and Conference AGMs
5.00-6.30. Joseph Hoover (City): “The Special Ambiguity of Humanity”
6.30. Reception: sponsored by Cambridge University Press
8.30-10.00. APT Lecture sponsored by Contemporary Political Theory: Onora O’Neill (Cambridge): “Speech Rights and Speech Wrongs”

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