Author Archives: Matthew Rendall

CfP: Climate Ethics and Climate Economics–Risk, Uncertainty and Catastrophe Scenarios

May 9th & 10th, University of Cambridge

Scholars have warned that there is an uncertain chance of runaway climate change that could devastate the planet. At least since Hans Jonas’s The Imperative of Responsibility, some have argued that even low-probability existential risks should be treated in a fundamentally different way. How should we act when we believe that there is a chance of a catastrophe, but cannot make reliable probability estimates? How much should we worry about worst-case scenarios? What should we do when experts disagree about whether catastrophe is possible?

These are some of the questions we will be posing at the fifth of six ESRC-funded workshops exploring issues where the ethics and economics of climate change intersect. It will be held at the University of Cambridge’s Centre for the Study of Existential Risk. read more...

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Fat Tails: Imposing and Redistributing Risk: Call for Discussants and Participants

Climate Ethics And Climate Economics: Fat Tails – Imposing and Redistributing Risks
Workshop at the London School of Economics
Convened by Kai Spiekermann and Jonathan Aldred, supported by the ESRC

14-15 September 2016

Accompanied by public lectures given by Prof Pindyck and Prof Gardiner on the evening of the 13th and 15th of September
The third of six ESRC-funded workshops on Climate Ethics and Climate Economics

We are now looking for participants. Priority will be given to participants willing to act as discussants.

Confirmed Speakers
Professor Stephen Gardiner, University of Washington
Professor Robert S. Pindyck, MIT
Dr Simon Beard, Cambridge
Professor Simon Dietz, LSE
Eike Düvel, Graz
Dr Jonathan Herington, Kansas State University
Professor James Lenman, Sheffield
Kian Mintz-Woo, Graz
Dr Matthew Rendall, Nottingham
Vera Van Gool, Reading read more...

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Call for Abstracts: Fat Tails–Imposing and Redistributing Risks

Climate Ethics And Climate Economics: Fat Tails – Imposing and Redistributing Risks
Workshop at the London School of Economics
Convened by Kai Spiekermann and Jonathan Aldred, supported by the ESRC

14-15 September 2016

Accompanied by public lectures given by Prof Pindyck and Prof Gardiner on the evening of the 13th and 15th of September
The third of six ESRC-funded workshops on Climate Ethics and Climate Economics

Keynote Speakers
Professor Stephen Gardiner, University of Washington
Professor Robert S. Pindyck, MIT

This workshop will focus on large-scale risks caused by climate change. In particular, we are interested in discussing theoretical, empirical and normative questions arising from large-scale risks and so-called “fat tail” risk distributions. The realizations that climate change may well be catastrophic and the probabilities of catastrophic outcomes difficult to quantify has shifted the debate towards more “precautionary” approaches. Debates about the most rational response to large scale risks and uncertainty should be complemented by a normative analysis of risk imposition: under which conditions, if any, is it permissible to impose such risks or redistribute them from one group to another? The workshop seeks to bring together economists, philosophers and practitioners to tackle these pressing questions. read more...

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Climate Ethics and Climate Economics: How to Finance ‘Well Below 2°C’?

Proposal deadline extended to March 10th

 The second of six ESRC-funded workshops exploring issues where the ethics and economics of climate change intersect will be held at the University of Nottingham on 13-14 April 2016. The keynote speakers will be John Broome and Armon Rezai.

The spotlight of the workshop will be on the economics and ethics of rapidly increasing the climate finance necessary to meet the Paris Accord mitigation goal of well below 2°C. Estimates of the necessary annual investments in low/zero emissions energy generation to meet this goal are from 1000 to 2000 billion USD. This is three to six times current investment levels. The workshop will address recent proposals from John Broome and others to ‘borrow from the future’ to pay for mitigation. The idea is to use some form of debt financing and investment diverting to achieve mitigation ‘without sacrifice’ from the current generation and to break political logjams. We also encourage papers on other topics on increasing climate financing, such as alternative financing proposals, financing the Green Climate Fund, and assessments of the true obstacles to scaling up climate finance. Finally, we are happy to consider other proposals that are at the intersection of climate ethics and climate economics, but not focused on financing. read more...

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CfP: Climate Ethics and Climate Economics–‘Efficiency Without Sacrifice’: A Novel Way to Fund Mitigation?

The second of six ESRC-funded workshops exploring issues where the ethics and economics of climate change intersect will be held at the University of Nottingham on 13-14 April 2016. The keynote speakers will be John Broome and Armon Rezai.

The spotlight in the workshop will be on recent proposals to shift the burden of mitigating climate change to future generations. The idea is to mobilize resources today for mitigation investments in a manner that does not involve any or only modest net-costs today. This might be done by taking on public debt in some form or through diverting investments from some sectors towards mitigation and increasing consumption of resources we would otherwise pass down to future generations,. What John Broome has called ‘efficiency without sacrifice’ might break the political logjam and encourage the present generation to take action, while still leaving future generations better off than they would be in the absence of climate mitigation. The idea is attracting increasing attention from both economists and political theorists, but is still new and in need of discussion. Is it even possible to shift the burden in this way, and if so, would it be justified? read more...

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CfP: Climate Ethics and Climate Economics

The first of six ESRC-funded workshops exploring issues where the ethics and economics of climate change intersect will be held at Oxford University’s Martin School on 13-14 January 2015. The keynote speakers will be Simon Caney and Partha Dasgupta.

We have space in the workshop for eight additional presentations, and an equal number of discussants. Funds are available to cover accommodation and internal travel expenses for up to three research students and early-career researchers. Preference will be given to proposals on the workshop theme of discounting, but we will also consider proposals on other topics. Papers will be circulated before the workshop. read more...

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