Category Archives: Posts

NEW BOOK

People here may like to know of this book on Hegel’s Phenomenology and Foucault’s Genealogy. The book examines these two projects – looks at their commonalities as well as differences -, considers their implications for social and political theory, as … Continue reading

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Religion, Public Reason and Thinking of the Children: Comments on Chapter 7

I am genuinely, truly honored by Harry Brighouse’s comments on the last chapter of my book. Brighouse is one of philosophy’s great theorists of education, and I learned a lot from his remarks. Brighouse’s core worry is that my chapter … Continue reading

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On Legislative Restraint and Religious Accommodation: Replies on Chapter 6

Apologies for the delay in posting my reply to Chad’s really rich comments on Chapter 6 of my book. I decided to delay until after Thanksgiving, as I thought people might be more likely to read the post. But Chad’s … Continue reading

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On Vallier’s Ch. 6 “Reconciliation in Law”

I have known Kevin and his work for five years, and I am glad that so many great people have joined in this reading group. Special thanks go to Simon May for supporting our discussion. I will here keep my … Continue reading

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Idealization, Judicial Reasoning and Reasonableness: Replies on Chapter 5

Thanks very much to Lori to an extensive summary of Chapter 5 and probing comments. I hope that my replies continue to advance the discussion. I think there are some things I could clear up about the role of idealization … Continue reading

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Sincerity, Individuation and Classical Liberal Public Reason: Comments on Chapter 4

Let me begin by thanking Blain for an excellent recap of Chapter 4 of the book, which is arguably the centerpiece chapter. He raises five important concerns, but I’m going to set two aside. First, Blain raises the question of … Continue reading

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