Category Archives: Books

Two New Books: Ethical Issues in Poverty Alleviation & Ethics and the Endangerment of Children’s Bodies

The Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research, University of Salzburg, is happy to announce the publication of two new books by its members in political philosophy.

Ethics and the Endangerment of Children’s Bodies (Palgrave Macmillan 2017)

by Gunter Graf & Gottfried Schweiger

This book addresses the endangerment of children’s bodies in affluent societies. Bodily integrity is an important part of a child’s physical and mental well-being, but it can also be violated through various threats during childhood; not only affecting physical health but also causing mental damage and leading to distortions in the development of the self. The authors give an account of three areas, which present different serious dangers: (1) body and eating, (2) body and sexuality, and (3) body and violence. Through an in-depth examination of the available theoretical and empirical knowledge, as well as a thorough ethical analysis, the central injustices in the mentioned areas are identified and the agents with responsibilities towards children displayed. The authors conclude by providing invaluable insight into the necessity of an ethical basis for policies to safeguard children and their bodies.

Ethical Issues in Poverty Alleviation (Springer 2016)

edited by Helmut P Gaisbauer, Gottfried Schweiger & Clemens Sedmak

This book explores the philosophical, and in particular ethical, issues concerning the conceptualization, design and implementation of poverty alleviation measures from the local to the global level. It connects these topics with the ongoing debates on social and global justice, and asks what an ethical or normative philosophical perspective can add to the economic, political, and other social science approaches that dominate the main debates on poverty alleviation. Divided into four sections, the volume examines four areas of concern: the relation between human rights and poverty alleviation, the connection between development and poverty alleviation, poverty within affluent countries, and obligations of individuals in regard to global poverty.

Posted in Books | Tagged , | Leave a comment

New Book — Exit Left: Markets and Mobility in Republican Thought

Robert S. Taylor, Exit Left: Markets and Mobility in Republican Thought (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017), xiv + 130 pp.

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/exit-left-9780198798736

How can citizens best protect themselves from the arbitrary power of abusive spouses, tyrannical bosses, and corrupt politicians? Taylor’s new book, Exit Left, makes the case that in each of these three spheres the answer is the same: exit. By promoting open and competitive markets and providing the information and financial resources necessary to enable exit, we can empower people’s voices and offer them an escape from abuse and exploitation. This will advance a conception of freedom, viz. freedom as non-domination (FND), that is central to contemporary republican thought. Neorepublicans have typically promoted FND through constitutional means (separation of powers, judicial review, the rule of law, and federalism) and participatory ones (democratic elections and oversight), but Exit Left focuses on economic means, ones that have been neglected by contemporary republicans but were commonly invoked in the older, commercial-republican tradition of Alexander Hamilton, Immanuel Kant, and Adam Smith. This book’s revival and revision of commercial republicanism will enlarge republican practice by encouraging greater use of market mechanisms, even as it hews closely to existing republican theory.

read more...

Posted in Books | Tagged | Leave a comment

Anarchism/Minarchism Anthology Now in Paperback

Anarchism/Minarchism:  Is a Government Part of a Free Country?

I’m pleased to announce that the 2008 anthology Anarchism/Minarchism: Is a Government Part of a Free Country?, edited by the late Tibor Machan and myself, is about to be released in paperback from Routledge (formerly Ashgate). It’s scheduled for the end of November, but can be pre-ordered now at Amazon (US here, Canada here, UK here).

At $55 it’s still a hefty pricetag, but it beats the hardback cost, which varies between $100 and $150.

The contents:

  • Lester Hunt: “Why the State Needs a Justification”

    Roger Lee: “Libertarianism, Limited Government, and Anarchy”

    read more...

Posted in Books | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

CfP: New Springer Book Series: “Philosophy and Poverty”

“Philosophy and Poverty”, a new fully peer-reviewed book series published by Springer. The first volume is scheduled to be published in 2018. The book series is edited by Henning Hahn, Gottfried Schweiger and Clemens Sedmak, whose work is supported by an international Advisory Board. It is the first book series to focus exclusively on philosophical research on poverty, which is an area of increasing interest and high social and political importance. The book series is not restricted to issues of ethics and justice which dominate the philosophical research on poverty, but is also open to questions related to the philosophy of science, epistemology or history of philosophy insofar as they relate to poverty.

Posted in Books, Calls for Papers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Oxford Handbook of Well-Being and Public Policy has just been published. The Handbook provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment of its topic.

The Handbook includes thirty chapters divided into four Parts. Part I covers the full range of methodologies for evaluating governmental policy and assessing societal condition — including both the leading approaches in current use by policymakers and academics (such as GDP, cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, inequality and poverty metrics, and the concept of the “social welfare function”), and emerging techniques (such as “social ordering functions,” multidimensional indices grounded in the notion of “capabilities,” and happiness-based policy analysis). Part II focuses on the nature of well-being. What, most fundamentally, determines whether an individual life is better or worse for the person living it? Her happiness? Her preference-satisfaction? Her attainment of various “objective goods”? Part III addresses the measurement of well-being and the thorny topic of interpersonal comparisons. How can we construct a meaningful scale of individual welfare, which allows for comparisons of well-being levels and differences, both within one individual’s life, and across lives? Should we even attempt to do so, or is it better to evaluate policy with respect to each “capability” taken separately? Finally, Part IV reviews the major challenges to designing governmental policy around individual well-being: social evaluation under risk and uncertainty, the role of individual responsibility, badly behaved preferences, measuring well-being on a lifetime basis, measurement challenges posed by price heterogeneity and household-level data, and policy effects on future generations.

read more...

Posted in Books, Posts | Leave a comment

Liberal Neutrality and State Support for Religion (Springer 2016), by Leni Franken

This book focuses on the financing of religions, examining some European church-state models, using a philosophical methodology. The work defends autonomy-based liberalism and elaborates how this liberalism can meet the requirements of liberal neutrality. The chapters also explore religious education and the financing of institutionalized religion. This volume collates the work of top scholars in the field. Starting from the idea that autonomy-based liberalism is an adequate framework for the requirement of liberal neutrality, the author elaborates why a liberal state can support religions and how she should do this, without violating the principle of neutrality. Taking into account the principle of religious freedom and the separation of church and state, this work explores which criteria the state should take into account when she actively supports religions, faith-based schools and religious education. A number of concrete church-state models, including hands-off, religious accommodation and the state church are evaluated, and the book gives some recommendations in order to optimize those church-state models, where needed. Practitioners and scholars of politics, law, philosophy and education, especially religious education, will find this work of particular interest as it has useful guidelines on policies and practices, as well as studies of church-state models.

read more...

Posted in Books | Leave a comment