Category Archives: Books

Anarchism/Minarchism Anthology Now in Paperback

Anarchism/Minarchism:  Is a Government Part of a Free Country?

I’m pleased to announce that the 2008 anthology Anarchism/Minarchism: Is a Government Part of a Free Country?, edited by the late Tibor Machan and myself, is about to be released in paperback from Routledge (formerly Ashgate). It’s scheduled for the end of November, but can be pre-ordered now at Amazon (US here, Canada here, UK here).

At $55 it’s still a hefty pricetag, but it beats the hardback cost, which varies between $100 and $150.

The contents:

  • Lester Hunt: “Why the State Needs a Justification”

    Roger Lee: “Libertarianism, Limited Government, and Anarchy”

    Adam Reed: “Rationality, History, and Inductive Politics”

    William Thomas: “Objectivism Against Anarchy”

    Tibor Machan: “Reconciling Anarchism and Minarchism”

    Aeon Skoble: “Radical Freedom and Social Living”

    Jan Narveson: “The State: From Minarchy to Anarchy”

    John Hasnas: “The Obviousness of Anarchy”

    Roderick Long: “Market Anarchism As Constitutionalism”

    Charles Johnson: “Liberty, Equality, Solidarity: Toward a Dialectical Anarchism”

    Here are a couple of reviews of the original hardback edition:

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CfP: New Springer Book Series: “Philosophy and Poverty”

“Philosophy and Poverty”, a new fully peer-reviewed book series published by Springer. The first volume is scheduled to be published in 2018. The book series is edited by Henning Hahn, Gottfried Schweiger and Clemens Sedmak, whose work is supported by an international Advisory Board. It is the first book series to focus exclusively on philosophical research on poverty, which is an area of increasing interest and high social and political importance. The book series is not restricted to issues of ethics and justice which dominate the philosophical research on poverty, but is also open to questions related to the philosophy of science, epistemology or history of philosophy insofar as they relate to poverty.

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The Oxford Handbook of Well-Being and Public Policy has just been published. The Handbook provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment of its topic.

The Handbook includes thirty chapters divided into four Parts. Part I covers the full range of methodologies for evaluating governmental policy and assessing societal condition — including both the leading approaches in current use by policymakers and academics (such as GDP, cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, inequality and poverty metrics, and the concept of the “social welfare function”), and emerging techniques (such as “social ordering functions,” multidimensional indices grounded in the notion of “capabilities,” and happiness-based policy analysis). Part II focuses on the nature of well-being. What, most fundamentally, determines whether an individual life is better or worse for the person living it? Her happiness? Her preference-satisfaction? Her attainment of various “objective goods”? Part III addresses the measurement of well-being and the thorny topic of interpersonal comparisons. How can we construct a meaningful scale of individual welfare, which allows for comparisons of well-being levels and differences, both within one individual’s life, and across lives? Should we even attempt to do so, or is it better to evaluate policy with respect to each “capability” taken separately? Finally, Part IV reviews the major challenges to designing governmental policy around individual well-being: social evaluation under risk and uncertainty, the role of individual responsibility, badly behaved preferences, measuring well-being on a lifetime basis, measurement challenges posed by price heterogeneity and household-level data, and policy effects on future generations.

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Liberal Neutrality and State Support for Religion (Springer 2016), by Leni Franken

This book focuses on the financing of religions, examining some European church-state models, using a philosophical methodology. The work defends autonomy-based liberalism and elaborates how this liberalism can meet the requirements of liberal neutrality. The chapters also explore religious education and the financing of institutionalized religion. This volume collates the work of top scholars in the field. Starting from the idea that autonomy-based liberalism is an adequate framework for the requirement of liberal neutrality, the author elaborates why a liberal state can support religions and how she should do this, without violating the principle of neutrality. Taking into account the principle of religious freedom and the separation of church and state, this work explores which criteria the state should take into account when she actively supports religions, faith-based schools and religious education. A number of concrete church-state models, including hands-off, religious accommodation and the state church are evaluated, and the book gives some recommendations in order to optimize those church-state models, where needed. Practitioners and scholars of politics, law, philosophy and education, especially religious education, will find this work of particular interest as it has useful guidelines on policies and practices, as well as studies of church-state models.

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Workshop, David Miler, Strangers in our Midst: the political philosophy of immigration

Workshop on

David Miller, Strangers in Our Midst: the political philosophy of immigration, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press

Institute for Philosophy, Hamburg University

March 18th, 2016, Room tbd

Organizers: Thomas Schramme, Christine Straehle

 

Registration: The workshop is open to everyone, but attendance is by registration and limited in number. RSVP by sending an email to millerworkshopHH@gmail.com

Format: Upon registration, participants will receive the manuscript. To maximize the quality of discussion, participants are expected to have read the manuscript beforehand. The workshop comprises four sessions dedicated to the manuscript. Each session will begin with brief critiques of chapters of the manuscript, followed by a brief response by the author and general discussion.

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New Book — Commercium: Critical Theory from a Cosmopolitan Point of View

by Brian Milstein

Since the end of the Cold War, there has been a wealth of discussion and controversy about the idea of a “postnational” or “cosmopolitan” politics. Yet while we have seen many normative theories of cosmopolitanism (David Held, Thomas Pogge) and some cosmopolitan-oriented theories of globalization (Ulrich Beck, Gerard Delanty), there has been little attempt to grapple systematically with fundamental questions of structure and action from a cosmopolitan perspective.

This book departs from previous theoretical treatments of contemporary world politics in that, instead of adopting the conventional image of essentially bounded nation-states that are just recently becoming interdependent with one another, it takes societies to be already essentially interconnected and analyzes their differentiation into a system of sovereign nation-states. Drawing from the cosmopolitan writings of Immanuel Kant and the critical theory of Jürgen Habermas, this book argues that, before we are members of nations, states, or other bounded communities, we are originally participants in what Kant called a commercium of global interaction who are able to negotiate for ourselves the terms on which we share the earth in common with one another. It marshals a broad range of literature from philosophy, sociology, and international relations to show how the modern system of sovereign states destructively impedes, constrains, and distorts these relations of global interaction, producing contradictions and legitimation problems in present-day world society.

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